Mare Au Cochons, Au Seychelles

Strap on your sensible walking shoes. Grab your cap. A bottle of water. Sun spray. Mosquito repellent and as much food as you would like because we are going on a trail! Oh and guess what? You’re coming along with me! Nature lovers will always be nature lovers right? You’re in Seychelles and you want to go on a hike because the only place you feel at peace is on a trail surrounded by a variety of green pastures. You want to leave the sound of the wave behind, or your parents made you tag along because they are nature lovers. Or maybe you simply want to see the island.

Mare Au Cochons trail is one of the most well-known trails in the Seychelles. The trail starts at Le Niole or Bel Ombre, depending on your location and it leads through the forest of the North. Along the way there are points where you can stop and admire the timeless beauty that is the coast of Bel Ombre opposite the Silhouette Island. The view is vast and beyond words to describe its beauty. The white foam of waves caresses the white sandy coast and the green pastures highlight its splendour. It is truly a picture perfect frame with a 360 degrees panorama of the mountains up above and the ocean and islands completing the masterpiece.

While walking to Mare Au Cochons there are streams of fresh water flowing either along the walls of the path you’re walking next to or on the granite rocks, flowing to complete the water cycle. The smell of nature is more than just refreshing when you’re surrounded by the sound of dripping natural mineral water. There are multitudes of river coming from the mountains and you will see them along the way but if you don’t, you’ll certainly hear it.

There are tiny wooden kiosks that you can sit at and have some refreshments and a chat; however this is not the end of the trail. You will meet a large patch of extremely green grass coating the mountains, and these grasses are picture perfect and soft to lie down on and take the most scenic pictures you can imagine as it’s dotted with palm trees.

The trail doesn’t end there with more than a few back stories of how they used to produce cinnamon in bulk. There are evidence of the ruins along the way and a large variety of introduced crops such as Banana and sugar cane planted in neat rows, will show such a settlement.

You’ve seen all that can possibly be seen; now you’re on your way to the Mare au Cochons itself. The name is in French and translated to the ‘marsh of pigs’, however this must either be a legend or it has been said that the marsh was full of pigs at one point. Whichever story is true, nowadays there are no pigs in the marshy area of the Mare Au Cochon Trail. Once you’ve reach the marsh there will be a bridge to walk across and a small shack like kiosk to sit at and have your lunch or maybe your snack, depending on how fast you walk.

One known secret is that you can continue into the deep unraveling trail that is Mare Au Cochons, however you need to be with someone who knows the way because I am a hundred percent sure you do not want to be stuck in the dark mist of Mare au Cochons. Moreover if you don’t have a guide that can lead you down the steep mountain to the Grand Anse side of the trail then you can turn back and start walking home.

The Mare au Cochons connects to other trails such as Copolia. Spending a day in Nature will never be the same after the trail!

Home Life

An important staple to making a house a home, in my opinion, is the interior design.

Growing up, furniture and art made up a huge part of my childhood; my grandmother and mother would frequent the likes of Bali and Thailand for rare and beautiful, wooden pieces to go into their house.

Nowadays, we’ve calmed down in the Eden household. Most of our new pieces either come from Island Living, Concept or DIY Seychelles.

At Island Living, for example, we can find furniture and decor from India and Bali and other Asian countries, right here in Seychelles. The range of antiques and furnishings are to die for! Here you can choose between a variety of dining tables, cupboards, light fixtures and rugs. The best thing about shopping here and not going over seas is that you don’t have to pay for a plane ticket nor shipping!

The best thing about DIY Seychelles, is the amount of stuff they bring in. Here, their imports range from garden tools to home furnishings, pool items to sports equipment and everything in between. I’ve been able to get quite a few things here for my room, seeing as it’s going under renovations.

What do you think make a house, a home? Do you like interior design? Is your house in need of a makeover? Then get to shopping around town for the perfect accessories for your home!

What To Do In Seychelles

Starting from the 15th of January, Seychelles Promo has started up weekly videos of visual itineraries for those traveling to the Seychelles Islands.

First we will begin by showing you what you can accomplish in one day on the three main islands; with multiple one day videos with different routes. From there we will continue to show you what to do in three and five days on our beautiful islands.

Despite having written mini itineraries which you can find here, these visuals are more enticing and explanatory. In the videos, you can find maps and directions as well as images of the places we want to send you!

For this week, we have gifted you with a One Day On La Digue. This video will take you through a variety of beaches; from Grand Anse to Anse Source D’Argent, stopping along the way for some nourishment and history.

Enjoy our video and don’t forget to check out our website, SeychellesPromo.

Want to spend a day on La Digue? Check out our new weekly Itinerary video for some great tips!Click the link to check out our website #seychellespromo #seypromo #seychelles #islands #ladigue #travel #trip #holiday #vacation #explore #beaches #adventure

Posted by Seychelles Promo on Sunday, January 21, 2018


Last week’s video for Praslin

Looking for tips on how to spend your holiday in Seychelles?Check out our One Day On Praslin Itinerary to find out how to enjoy your trip!Click here to visit our website #seychellespromo #seypromo #seychelles #praslin #itinerary #vacation #travel #trip

Posted by Seychelles Promo on Monday, January 15, 2018

Positive Vibes

Happy New Year everyone!

Just like every New Year I think it’s important to settle on some goals and resolutions for the following year. And yes maybe I forget these things after the first week but it’s still important to set them ahead of time to figure out the kind of year that you are going to have.

Now the usual type of resolutions people always have are “go to the gym” and “drink less” and “work hard”. I have been told that these shouldn’t be resolutions; they should be a normal task that you do every year!

Due to my busy schedule last year – of working and watching TV shows till I passed out of course – I couldn’t go to the gym as often as I wished. And despite hearing it should be part of my normal routine, I still make it my New Years Resolution.

What a lot of people don’t seem to be able to do is empathize with others, especially nowadays. When I told my friend that I couldn’t find the time to go to the gym every week, I was laughed at and asked what was so important that I couldn’t give a couple of hours to working out. Sure! I could’ve have taken the time I spent watching shows and reading books and spent at the gym. However, a lot of people don’t seem to realize is that not everyone is the same. A job that others might find easy and not tiring, can be seen as exhausting for others where all they feel like doing is shutting down once they reach home.

I am one of those people.

Now your personal goals or resolutions for the year shouldn’t be made in haste. You shouldn’t define your year based on the choices of others. Just because you see other people posting their gym selfies and their vacations doesn’t mean you have to do the same.

Don’t feel pressured into taking a new hobby or throwing your life savings away to have an amazing holiday.

Your goals should be your own.

What you wish to complete this New Year should be completely up to you and you alone.

What you should definitely do though, is make sure you continue living your best life. Be the best you can be and the happiest with whatever you choose!


Wrapping Up The Year

Shopping at the last minute for Christmas is the most stressful activity concerning this holiday month that I can think of. The only thing that makes it easier is that I more or less know what I am going to buy for each of my friends and family.

The best thing that you can do if you know you will be late on shopping, whether you get paid late or you don’t have enough time, is to go around town and window shop. If you see something that sticks out or you know someone will enjoy, pop by and put it on hold. Another thing that helps with this dilemma is that town will be opening till late the closer we get to Christmas Day.

Now if you want to be super organized like me, I suggest getting a wrapping paper from Cosmorama that you can use for only the gifts you are giving. This helps to eliminate any confusion between who bought what when it comes to gift giving.

This year between my friends however is that we are going to try and do a Secret Santa gift giving; not only is it more affordable but also less stressful. When you only have one friend to focus on, you won’t end up messing up and buying the wrong gift for the wrong person.

My only problem is that I enjoy buying gifts for people. It is one of my favorite things. I know my friends so well that when I see something I know one will like, i get the impulse to just buy it, despite not knowing whether they reciprocate. I don’t mind not getting anything in turn, it’s the happiness that is enough for me.

Shopping Around The Christmas Tree

Christmas is fast approaching on our less than sunny Seychelles Islands, and along with it, Christmas Shopping.

This to me is a dreaded time of year; traffic in town, lining up and trying to buy as many things before everything is sold out is stressful. What makes all this worthwhile however is the happiness that radiates around the house on Christmas Day when all the gifts are exchanged.

I’m still trying to figure out what to buy everyone this year and it is very important to budget yourself accordingly. You have to guesstimate how much you want to spend on who and what is more important; does something small and significant have more meaning than a bunch of little gifts together?

As each year passes, my Christmas list changes. This year for example, I have moved away from asking for books and instead gone after household items. From cushions to rugs to little decorations for my home. These items have become more and more easier to find as Seychelles also progresses.

I know my mother as well has similar tastes, but instead of asking for a bunch of things, she prefers the meaningful gifts. It isn’t about how many presents she gets but what one of them might mean to her. My grandmother is more indecisive. She never knows what she wants but somehow my mother always knows what to get her.

Friends are easy to shop for. I know who would prefer a voucher of some sort and who would like something more material.

Do you know what your friends and family want for Christmas? Don’t leave your Christmas Shopping to the last minute!

For furniture ideas check out Island Living and DIY.

Check out Sarah’s Kids Corner for children.

For spa vouchers check out this list of spas here.

For a wider range of shops check out this page.

Christmas Ready

As our calendars make their way to mid-November, a lot of people make the decision of decorating for Christmas early; or if you’re anything like me, remind those that do, that it is still November!

My mother won’t listen to me as she makes me go get the Christmas decorations out of storage and dust off my father’s custom made Palm-like Christmas tree. Her theme this year is Under The Sea. The baubles are all colored shades of blues and greens, glimmering in the late afternoon sunlight on our veranda. I am still insisting that it is “only November!” but she ignores me in favor of her Celtic Christmas music.

Being half-American means that Thanksgiving is also thrown in the running along with our yearly Holidays in Seychelles, and in my home it usually means a quiet meal shared with family and remembering the history of such a ‘holiday’ However, my mom has decided to forgo this Thanksgiving meal and remind me that we (her, my grandmother and I) all have birthdays in November.

This means that we are just going to jump straight to into Christmas spirit and drink liqueur coffee while watching the rain pour down outside. Being a humid country means no snow but plenty of rain for the rest of the year. The rain can’t drown out the Yuletide cheer though. It’s thick and distinct and smells like vanilla and cinnamon and it shouldn’t because its “still November!”

No one hears me still. My Grandmother has decided to  pull out a small faux tree to place upon her coffee table and my mother has once again convinced me to decorate something else; it’s the fake bamboo plant and it is now adorned with burgundy baubles.

It seems like our town of Victoria is the only one who’s rational; the streets are yet to be fully decorated to the max as it had been last time around. But the resolve is slowly breaking as Seychellois’ comment on Facebook about the lack of festive cheer. Slowly, but surely, lights are being strung up and the Christmas music is playing on almost every radio channel.

We have almost over a week left of November and I tend to cling to it as hard as I can. It isn’t that I hate Christmas; I love the food my family shares and the gifts we give. Perhaps it’s the American in me that is used to having holidays forced upon me, one after the other as another year comes to a close.

What I won’t do though, is begrudge my mothers happiness and instead I’ll complain to the dog as I light all the scented candles that smell like sugary goodness and have my ears berated by cheery flutes and harps.

Although, don’t let my Grinch like behavior get you down! Christmas is a wonderful holiday (when it’s December!). Think of the treats and the Advent Calendars and the warmth of family.

What is Christmas like in your home? Is it cold and white or sunny and bright? Are you excited or just not that interested? Leave me a comment and let me know how you feel about one of the biggest holidays of the year!

For decorations check out Cosmorama and Pineapple Boutique for scented candles.

Festival Kreol

Every year for the past twenty six years, the people of Seychelles come together to pay homage to their culture.

The Festival Kreol is held every end of October and always represents beautiful Creole culture through food, art, music and more.  The week long celebration from the 20th of October to the 30th, is bursting at the seems with fun events. Restaurants also participate with special deals and activities to commemorate this week.

Despite the festival taking place in Seychelles on Mahé, Praslin and La Digue, the week long celebration recognizes and welcomes all Creole cultures from across the globe.

The itinerary for this years Festival Kreol is as follows


A Brief History of Seychelles

According to historians, Vasco de Gama came across islands as he was traveling from India to East Africa in 1503. These islands then became known as the Amirantes. In the year of 1608, the East India Trading Company came across land that was in abundance of resources after getting caught in a storm. Despite reporting the island they inhabited for a short time, the British took no claim over the land.

The Isle de France which is now known as Mauritius had been occupied by the French since 1715 and by 1742, an administrator by the name of Bertrand-François Mahé de La Bourdonnais sent an expedition under the command of Lazare Picault to chart the islands northeast of Madagascar.

By November of the same year, the boats Elizabeth and Charles had anchored in Mahé at Anse Boileau and Ile d’Abondance was born. However, due to the fact that the mapping was so poor, Picault headed back to the island in 1744 and renamed it Mahé after La Bourdonnais. The islands ended up being forgotten two years later once La Bourdonnais was replaced.

The Seven Years War between England and France in 1754, reminded the authorities of Mauritius and its neighboring islands and thus two ships were sent to claim them once more. Under the command of Corneille Nicholas Morphey, the largest island was renamed Isle de Séchelles in honor of Viscount Jean Moreau de Séchelles. This name then became Anglicized as Seychelles and was then used as the name for the entire group of islands; Mahé becoming the largest island once more.

After the French Revolution, a Colonial Assembly was formed by the settlers on Mahé In 1790. It was decided that they would run their colony themselves, according to their own constitution.

In 1794, Jean-Baptiste Queau de Quincy took command of the colony, making Seychelles a haven for French corsairs. Despite trying to stay under the radar, in 1794, three British ships arrived under commodore Henry Newcome to Mahé. He gave Quincy an hour to surrender.

Alas, the British didn’t feel the need to claim Seychelles due to the fact that they believed it to be a waste of resources. This made the island a neutral ground to British and French folk alike, supplying newcomers.

If you fast forward to the British rule of Seychelles, around 2.400 men women and children were brought to the islands over a period of thirteen years from 1861.

The main town had been known as Victoria since 1841 and was growing exponentially. By 1879 there were a range of businesses in town; two auctioneers, five retailers, four  liquor stores, an attorney and a watchmaker to name a few.

When Seychelles wanted to become a colony in its own right, the Mauritian governor of the mother colony sent a petition to London but Seychelles did not become a Crown Colony until 1903 when Sir Ernest Bickham Sweet-Escott became Governor. The French language remained dominant and the botanical gardens were created along with the clock tower residing in the heart of Victoria.

But just like the French, the British saw Seychelles as the perfect place for exiling political prisoners.

It was not until 1964 that any new political movements were created, giving birth to the Seychelles People’s United Party led by France-Albert René. The party rallied for socialism and independance from British rule. The late James Mancham’s party called the Seychelles Democratic Party, represented businessmen and planters and wanted closer integration with Britain.

When the elections began in 1966, SDP won. Further elections in November 1970 brought about a new constitution, putting Mancham as Chief Minister. With elections in 1974, both parties ended up campaigning for independence. After that election the British agreed to allow Seychelles to become independent under the Commonwealth on June 29th, 1976. Sir James Mancham became the first President and René as Prime Minister.

René, however was not satisfied and threw a coup d’état on the 5th of June. 1977, overthrowing Mancham while he was overseas. This resulted in Seychelles becoming a one party state for the next 16 years. A number of Seychellois were displaced and exiled within these times

On December 4th, 1991, President René  announced the return of the multiparty system.

This failed to remove President René and his political party from the Presidency and the now SPPF, remained in power for the next 22 years.

By 2016, and after years of losing presidential elections, the opposing party SNP joined forces with other oppositions in the National Assembly elections. This resulted in a 15 to 10 district win for the newly formed LDS, and the first time in 38 years that there was a new party that claimed the majority of parliament.

A Brief History on Food and Dance

Two main things most people would associate with Seychelles could be argued as food and dance. These two things almost always go hand in hand and are incredibly popular among Seychellois and tourists alike. The traditional music and dance shows the culturally diverse background of our nation’s history.

Seychellois Dance

There happens to be a plethora of different traditional dances that are practiced in Seychelles but I will be writing about my three favorite.

The Moutia is a fan favorite with its percussion and string instruments. It contains foreign influences from when Seychelles had been colonized by the French in the 18th century followed by the British in the 19th. They brought about the guitar and violin which play a large part in Seychelles’ music today.

The Sega dance is the most popular of dance styles; the go to when learning Seychelles’ dances. With its characteristic hip-swaying movements, it is believe that it began with the slave population on the islands of Reunion and Mauritius. Sega music is traditionally performed with hand drums and rattles. while the feet remain planted on the floor in a rhythmic shuffle.

Kanmtole music is always fun to listen to. It bears a resemblance to the French Royal Court’s contredanse as well as Scottish square dancing. Accompanied by an accordion, violin and banjos, the contredanse was a French version of English country dances integrated with steps typical of the French court. Dating from the early 19th century, the kanmtole is a lively blend of all these dance styles.

Other musical styles in Seychelles include hip-hop, country, modern jazz, rock, ballads and choirs performing traditional popular, sacred, ancient and evangelical music. It’s thanks to Seychelles’ diverse past that these music and dance styles have evolved over the centuries to give the nation its rich musical heritage.

Seychellois Cuisine

Fish is definitely a big player in Seychellois cuisine and fishing happens to play a large part in our Blue Economy. Fish can be prepared in several ways, including, but not limited to: steamed, grilled, baked, boiled, fried, salted, smoked and wrapped in banana leaves. However, fish isn’t the only sea dweller that locals enjoy to catch and eat.

Other big ‘fish’ that were consumed in most Seychellois homes back in the day, included dolphin and turtles which were known as manze rar; rare food. These meats have since been forbidden by local authorities and marine parks, but some still risk it for that old Creole feeling. Sharks however, are fair game. One thing Seychellois can pride themselves in is using every part of the animals they consume. For shark you can make soup, salads/chutneys, curries and more with different parts respectively. Shark chutney, a personal favorite, typically consists of boiled, finely mashed skinned shark, and cooked with lime and bilimbi juice. Fried onions and spices are mixed along with it and makes this a perfect side dish or samosa filling.

Another type of meat that is popular in Seychelles is bat meat. Bat curry is something that can be found in authentic creole restaurants who can gain access to these creatures and is a great delicacy. Other curries can be found in almost any crock pot on the island! These curries can vary from salty to spicy, coconut cream enriched to tangy. Rice is also available with any meal.

Growing up, my family would enjoy eating a dish called ‘ladob’. Depending on the ingredients, I always found it to have a strange smell and was never fond of it, whether it was in savory or dessert form. The savory version usually had salted fish along with plantain, cassava or breadfruit with salt and boiled with coconut milk until soft. Its dessert dish omitted the fish (thank goodness!) along with the salt. It could be cooked with plantain, bananas, corossol, sweet potatoes, cassava or breadfruit and was seasoned in coconut milk with sugar, nutmeg and vanilla pods.

A few delicacies and specialty dishes include:

Bouyon bred
Kari bernik
Cassava pudding
Satini reken
Kat-kat banan
Salad palmis
Tec tec soup
Kari sousouri

Find more information on Creole cooking here.